Historians

  • David Mowery is a native resident of Cincinnati, Ohio, In 2001, he joined the  Ohio Civil War Trail Commission  and his role has included developing the final design for, and the historical validation of, the entire length of the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail of Ohio. He is the co-author (with Lora Cahill) of Morgan’s Raid Across Ohio: The Civil War Guidebook of the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail, all proceeds from which go to the Ohio Historical Society for the maintenance of the John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail in Ohio. He is the author of the recently released and highly acclaimed Morgan’s Great Raid: The Remarkable Expedition from Kentucky to Ohio.

  • Robert Mullauer teaches and leads tours on various military topics. He specializes in World War II, the American Civil War, and the Napoleonic Wars. He is a seasoned trekker of WWII battlefields in Europe and the Pacific.

  • Michael B. Murphy is a senior vice president at Hirons and Company, an Indianapolis advertising and public relations firm. He served as an Indiana state representative for 16 years and is a member of the Indiana Historical Society Board of Trustees. He is the author of The Kimberlins Go to War: A Union Family in Copperhead Country.

  • Jamie K. Oxendine, of Lumbee/Creek ancestry, is an adjunct professor at the University of Toledo, and a frequent speaker on Native American topics. He has served as a director of the Black Swamp Inter-tribal Foundation, and managing director of pow-wows.com. As a recording artist he was twice nominated for a NAMMY (Native American Music Award) for Best Independent Recording of the Year. Recently, he has worked with Douglas Blue Feather (4-time NAMMY Winner) with tracks on the 2010 CD Rollin’ Like Thunder and the 2005 CD Time For Truth.

  • Scott Patchan is widely regarded as the leading authority and tour guide of the 1864 Shenandoah Valley Campaign. He is the author of Shenandoah Summer: The 1864 Valley Campaign; Second Manassas: Longstreet's Attack and the Struggle for Chinn RidgeThe Battle of Piedmont and Hunter’s Campaign for Staunton; The Forgotten Fury: The Battle of Piedmont; and most recently, The Last Battle of Winchester: Phil Sheridan, Jubal Early, and the Shenandoah Valley Campaign, August 7 - September 19, 1864.

  • Kevin Pawlak is a Civil War historian who works as a Licensed Battlefield Guide at Antietam National Battlefield and an Education Specialist for the Mosby Heritage Area Association. He serves on the Board of Directors of the Shepherdstown Battlefield Preservation Association and previously worked and completed internships at Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, The Papers of Abraham Lincoln project at the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library, and the Missouri Civil War Museum.

  • DALE K. PHILLIPS is Superintendent of the Lincoln Home National Historic Site (NPS) in Springfield, Illinois. Previously he served as Superintendent at the George Rogers Clark National Historical Park (NPS) in Vincennes, Indiana. He is a veteran tour leader and speaker on Civil War, Revolutionary War and War of 1812 themes.

  • Mike Priest, a retired Washington County, Maryland high school history teacher, is an Antietam Battlefield Licensed Guide. He has written and/or edited 13 books and numerous articles on the American Civil War including: Antietam: The Soldiers' Battle; Before Antietam: The Battle for South Mountain; and Into the Fight: Pickett's Charge at Gettysburg. His latest book is Stand to It and Give Them Hell: Gettysburg as the Soldiers Experienced it from Cemetery Ridge to Little Round Top, July 2, 1863.

  • Carol Reardon is the George Winfree Professor of American History at Penn State University. She is a leading Gettysburg scholar and staff ride leader, and the author of many articles and books on military history including Launch the Intruders: A Naval Attack Squadron in the Vietnam War, 1972; Soldiers and Scholars: The U.S. Army and the Uses of Military History, 1865-1920; and Pickett's Charge in History and Memory.

  • Thomas Reinhart is an architectural historian and archaeologist with more than 20 years of experience studying and preserving the colonial Chesapeake.  He directed the State of Maryland’s architectural research program for over a decade, working with resources dating from the 17th through the 20th centuries.  He is now Director of Architecture at George Washington’s Mount Vernon, leading the study and preservation of the first president’s home.