Our 2015 conferences in Sarasota will again feature an impressive group of military historians and some World War II veterans - all soon to be announced.

During the conferences, books written by our faculty members will be available for sale, so you can secure autographed copies for your libraries.

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By June of 1863, the tide of the Civil War in the Western theater had already begun to turn against the Confederacy. With Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant’s success in enveloping the Confederate Army of Mississippi at Vicksburg, and with Union Maj. Gen. William Rosecrans’s strengthening hold upon the vital industrial city of Nashville, Tennessee, the future of the war in the West...

Following his crushing defeat of John Pope’s hapless Army of Virginia at the Battle of Second Bull Run, Robert E. Lee elected to take his Army of Northern Virginia northward across the Potomac River in an effort to bring the ravages of war to Northern territory. In early September 1862, the Confederates began their invasion of Maryland, opening it with a complex...

The Civil War left an enduring legacy in Alabama where ideologies ranged from fiery secessionism to ardent Unionism. The first capital of the Confederacy was located in Montgomery. Union supporters in Winston County threatened to secede from the state. Selma saw the late-war Battle of Ebenezer Church, and its arsenal manufactured most of the Confederacy’s ammunition. After the Civil War...

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We enthusiastically announce our 9th Annual All-Star Tour of Gettysburg, which promises to be outstanding! The program, designed for serious yet fun-loving students of the battle, will include four exciting and unusual in-depth tours led by top experts including the most famous battlefield guide of all - ED BEARSS – plus a delectable feast prepared by Paul Dorsette on...

Within a few weeks after Robert E. Lee drove away the Federals who had besieged Richmond in 1862, he extended his theater of operations northward. Stonewall Jackson, the hero of the Shenandoah Valley but an enigmatic failure around Richmond, moved his half of the army into Orange County to counter the emerging new threat posed by John Pope...

Of the four-pronged simultaneous movements ordered by Ulysses S. Grant in the spring of 1864, only one was successful in its initial design. Early in May, William Tecumseh Sherman, commanding the Military Division of the Mississippi consisting of three armies of eight corps, marched and rolled out of Chattanooga on a 100-mile mission to Atlanta. Four months,...

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